F Scott Fitzgerald

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald

  • American


American author of novels and short stories, notable for defining the Jazz Age. His fifth novel (unfinished), The Love of the Last Tycoon, was published posthumously. - AsNotedIn


Timeline

Y/M/D Description Association Composition Place Locale Food Event
Y/M/D Description Association Composition Place Locale Food Event
1896/09/24 Born Born F Scott Fitzgerald's Birthday
1913/00/00 Enters as undergraduate Education Princeton University
1914/00/00 593 Summit Ave was the Fitzgerald home from 1914-1919 Home F Scott Fitzgerald House St Paul
1919/07/00 Fitzgeralds move to 599 Summit Ave, Scott Fitzgerald returns from Princeton, retools a rejected manuscript into 'This Side of Paradise' Home This Side of Paradise F Scott Fitzgerald House St Paul
1920/00/00 Flappers and Philosophers - published Author Flappers and Philosophers
1920/03/26 This Side of Paradise is published, the first printing sells out in 3 days Author This Side of Paradise
1920/04/00 F Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Sayre marry in the rectory of St Patricks Cathedral Groom St Patrick's Cathedral New York City Marriage of Zelda Sayre and F Scott Fitzgerald
1920/05/01 "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" is published in The Saturday Evening Post. Author Bernice Bobs Her Hair
1922/00/00 The Beautiful and Damned - published Author The Beautiful and Damned
1922/10/00 Home of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald October 1922 - April 1924, Scott works on 'The Great Gatsby' Home The Great Gatsby F Scott Fitzgerald Home North Hempstead
1924/04/05 How to Live on $36,000 a Year is published in Saturday Evening Post Author How to Live on $36,000 a Year F Scott Fitzgerald Home North Hempstead
1925/04/10 "The Great Gatsby" is published. Author The Great Gatsby
1933/00/00 F Scott Fitzgerald moves to 1307 Park Ave, stays until 1935, Zelda comes for the weekends. Scott finishes 'Tender is The Night' Home Tender is the Night Bolton Hill Historic District Baltimore
1934/00/00 "Tender is the Night" is published. Author Tender is the Night
1935/00/00 Scott Fitzgerald stays at the Grove Park Inn in the summers of 1935 and 1936, Zelda was in Highland Hospital Visitor Grove Park Inn Asheville
1937/06/00 F Scott Fitzgerald write scripts for MGM, June 1937 to December 1938, earning $85,000 - more than $1,100 per week Work Hollywood
1939/01/00 F Scott Fitzgerald works briefly on Gone With the Wind Work Gone with the Wind
1939/02/00 F Scott Fitzgerald and Budd Schulberg are fired from the feature film, Winter Carnival, for intoxication after a three-day bender on location at the Winter Carnival, Dartmoor. Schulberg wrote about it in his novel The Disenchanted. Work Dartmouth College campus Hanover
1940/12/14 Fitzgerald, Sheilah Graham, Elliot Paul, Sidney Perelman and Laura Perelman play charades in the living room of the Wests' home at 12706 Magnolia Blvd, North Hollywood. Friend North Hollywood California Death of Fitzgerald, McKenney and West
1940/12/20 As Fitzgerald and Sheilah Graham leave the premiere of "This Thing Called Love" starring Rosalind Russell and Melvyn Douglas, Fitzgerald experiences a dizzy spell and says to Graham, "They think I am drunk, don't they?". Life Pantages Theatre Los Angeles Death of Fitzgerald, McKenney and West
1940/12/21 F Scott Fitzgerald dies of a heart attack at the home of Sheilah Graham, 1443 N Hayworth Ave, Hollywood, CA. Died Hollywood Death of Fitzgerald, McKenney and West
1941/00/00 The Love of the Last Tycoon - published Author The Love of the Last Tycoon
1975/00/00 The remains of Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald are moved to a family plot at St Mary's Church. Memoriam Third Addition to Rockville and Old St Mary's Church and Cemetery Rockville Death of Fitzgerald, McKenney and West
2008/00/00 "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button " is released. Short Story Author The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

History

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in 1896 in St Paul Minnesota, and spent most of his boyhood there and in New York State. In 1913, he entered Princeton University, where his social life and extra-curricular activities limited his academic achievement. He left college in 1917 to join the Army, but was never sent overseas to the war zone. While stationed in Alabama he met Zelda Sayre, to whom he became engaged. During his military service he completed The Romantic Egoist, a novel about a young man's initiation into life, which was rejected for publication. After being demobilized, he found a job with an advertising agency in New York and wrote short stories, only a few of which he was able to market. His prospects appeared so uncertain that Zelda felt obliged to discontinue their engagement. Fitzgerald then returned to his parents' house in St. Paul, where he purposefully rewrote and enlarged his novel. When the new work appeared in 1920 as This Side of Paradise it achieved enormous success and won for its author the reputation of prime spokesman for the glamorous and emancipated youth of the Jazz Age.

Fitzgerald was now able to marry Zelda, and the young couple embarked on a heady period of fame and prosperity during which they sojourned in France and took up residence in various parts of the United States. Besides volumes of short stories, Fitzgerald soon published another novel, The Beautiful and Damned (1922). Three years later he published the novel usually considered to be his finest, The Great Gatsby. This carefully Grafted work was a striking parable of aspiration and desire, and is often considered to be one of the greatest novels in American literature. As Arthur Mizener has written: "The art of this book is nearly perfect. "

Despite his success, Fitzgerald was increasingly troubled by his own tendency to alcoholism and the growing mental illness of his wife. The panic of 1929 changed the nation's literary tastes as radically as its political outlook. When Fitzgerald's brilliant Tender is the Night appeared in 1934, it pleased neither the critics nor the public. Three years later, he went as a film script writer to California, where he died of a heart attack in 1940. His final novel, The Last Tycoon, was published in incomplete form the next year. - NRHP

8 Creative Works by F Scott Fitzgerald »

Title Type Association Y/M/D Moniker
Title Type Association Y/M/D Moniker
Flappers and Philosophers Author Book 1920/00/00
This Side of Paradise Author Book 1920/03/26
Bernice Bobs Her Hair Author Short Story 1920/05/01
The Beautiful and Damned Author Book 1922/00/00
How to Live on $36,000 a Year Author Article 1924/04/05
The Great Gatsby Author Book 1925/04/10
  • 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
  • All-TIME 100 Novels, since 1923 the beginning of TIME
  • Books of the Century
  • Le Monde's 100 Books of the Century
Tender is the Night Author Book 1934/00/00
  • 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die
The Love of the Last Tycoon Author Book 1941/00/00

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in 1896 in St Paul Minnesota, and spent most of his boyhood there and in New York State. In 1913, he entered Princeton University, where his social life and extra-curricular activities limited his academic achievement. He left college in 1917 to join the Army, but was never sent overseas to the war zone. While stationed in Alabama he met Zelda Sayre, to whom he became engaged. During his military service he completed The Romantic Egoist, a novel about a young man's initiation into life, which was rejected for publication. After being demobilized, he found a job with an advertising agency in New York and wrote short stories, only a few of which he was able to market. His prospects appeared so uncertain that Zelda felt obliged to discontinue their engagement. Fitzgerald then returned to his parents' house in St. Paul, where he purposefully rewrote and enlarged his novel. When the new work appeared in 1920 as This Side of Paradise it achieved enormous success and won for its author the reputation of prime spokesman for the glamorous and emancipated youth of the Jazz Age.

Fitzgerald was now able to marry Zelda, and the young couple embarked on a heady period of fame and prosperity during which they sojourned in France and took up residence in various parts of the United States. Besides volumes of short stories, Fitzgerald soon published another novel, The Beautiful and Damned (1922). Three years later he published the novel usually considered to be his finest, The Great Gatsby. This carefully Grafted work was a striking parable of aspiration and desire, and is often considered to be one of the greatest novels in American literature. As Arthur Mizener has written: "The art of this book is nearly perfect. "

Despite his success, Fitzgerald was increasingly troubled by his own tendency to alcoholism and the growing mental illness of his wife. The panic of 1929 changed the nation's literary tastes as radically as its political outlook. When Fitzgerald's brilliant Tender is the Night appeared in 1934, it pleased neither the critics nor the public. Three years later, he went as a film script writer to California, where he died of a heart attack in 1940. His final novel, The Last Tycoon, was published in incomplete form the next year. - NRHP

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