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Greece
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PlaceTypeAsNotedInArea
PlaceTypeAsNotedInArea
Aegina Island
Archaeological Site of Delphi Archaeological Landscape
Archaeological Site of Olympia Archaeological Park
Archaeological Sites of Mycenae and Tiryns Archaeological Park
Athens City
Chios Island
Corfu Island
Corinth Town
Crete Island
Delos Island
Diros Caves Natural Cave
Gatsouri Place
Hania Place
Heraklion Place
Hydra Island
Kalambaka Place
Kalidon Place
Lake Kerkini
Lake Vistonis
Lesvos Island
Marathon Place
Mendhenitsa Place
Meteora
Mires Place
Mount Athos
Mount Giona
Mount Olympus
Mount Taygetos Place
Mykonos Island
Mystras
Oxylithos Place
Patmos Island
Piraeus City
Pythagoreion and Heraion of Samos
Rhodes Island
Samothraki Place
Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus
Santorini Island
Spetses Island
Symi Island
Temple of Apollo Epicurius at Bassae
Thera Place
Thessaloniki Place
Vergina Place
Vikos Gorge Canyon

Eat and Drink »

FoodTypeDescription
FoodTypeDescription
Greek Gyro
Horiatiko Psomi Look for Horiatiko Psomi, a crusty country bread, in villages around Greece where it is baked in outdoor wood-burning ovens.
Lagana Lagana is a traditional flatbread usually baked for Clean Monday or Kathara Defthera, the first day of Great Lent before Easter.
Moussaka
Paximathia
Pita
Souvlaki
Spelt bread
Tsoureki



Information »

Location

Southern Europe, bordering the Aegean Sea, Ionian Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea, between Albania and Turkey - The World Factbook

Data »

Particulars for Greece:
Food Attribute Greek Food
Locale Type Nation

Data
Demonym: Greek
Corruption Perceptions Index - 2014, Transparency International: 69


History »

Greece achieved independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1830. During the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th century, it gradually added neighboring islands and territories, most with Greek-speaking populations. In World War II, Greece was first invaded by Italy (1940) and subsequently occupied by Germany (1941-44); fighting endured in a protracted civil war between supporters of the king and other anti-Communists and Communist rebels. Following the latter's defeat in 1949, Greece joined NATO in 1952. In 1967, a group of military officers seized power, establishing a military dictatorship that suspended many political liberties and forced the king to flee the country. In 1974, democratic elections and a referendum created a parliamentary republic and abolished the monarchy. In 1981, Greece joined the EC (now the EU); it became the 12th member of the European Economic and Monetary Union in 2001. In 2010, the prospect of a Greek default on its euro-denominated debt created severe strains within the EMU and raised the question of whether a member country might voluntarily leave the common currency or be removed. - The World Factbook

Creative Works »

WorkTypeAsNotedInCreatorNote
Astradeni Book Eugenia Fakinou
Fool's Gold Book Maro Douka
Hyperion Book Friedrich Holderlin
La belle Helene Opera Jacques Offenbach "La belle Helene" is set in Sparta, just before the Trojan War
The Daughter Book Pavlos Matesis
The Last Temptation of Christ Book Nikos Kazantzakis
The Late-Night News Book Petros Markaris
The Magus Book John Fowles Spetses Island was the inspiration for the fictional island of Phraxos in John Fowles' The Magus
The Penelopiad Book
Margaret Atwood The Penelopiad is set in Ithaca and Sparta in Greece
The Third Wedding Book Costas Taktsis
Ulysses Poem Alfred, Lord Tennyson Ulysses has returned to Ithaca
Uncle Petros and Goldbach's Conjecture Book Apostolos Doxiadis
Z Book Vassilis Vassilikos

Ulysses

By

It little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags, Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole Unequal laws unto a savage race, That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. I cannot rest from travel; I will drink Life to the lees. All times I have enjoy'd Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when Thro' scudding drifts the rainy Hyades Vext the dim sea. I am become a name; For always roaming with a hungry heart Much have I seen and known,-- cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments, Myself not least, but honor'd of them all,-- And drunk delight of battle with my peers, Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy. I am a part of all that I have met; Yet all experience is an arch wherethro' Gleams that untravell'd world whose margin fades For ever and for ever when I move. How dull it is to pause, to make an end, To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use! As tho' to breathe were life! Life piled on life Were all too little, and of one to me Little remains; but every hour is saved >From that eternal silence, something more, A bringer of new things; and vile it were For some three suns to store and hoard myself, And this gray spirit yearning in desire To follow knowledge like a sinking star, Beyond the utmost bound of human thought. This is my son, mine own Telemachus, to whom I leave the sceptre and the isle,-- Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfill This labor, by slow prudence to make mild A rugged people, and thro' soft degrees Subdue them to the useful and the good. Most blameless is he, centred in the sphere Of common duties, decent not to fail In offices of tenderness, and pay Meet adoration to my household gods, When I am gone. He works his work, I mine. There lies the port; the vessel puffs her sail; There gloom the dark, broad seas. My mariners, Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me,-- That ever with a frolic welcome took The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed Free hearts, free foreheads,-- you and I are old; Old age hath yet his honor and his toil. Death closes all; but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods. The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks; The long day wanes; the slow moon climbs; the deep Moans round with many voices. Come, my friends. 'T is not too late to seek a newer world. Push off, and sitting well in order smite The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths Of all the western stars, until I die. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down; It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles, And see the great Achilles, whom we knew. Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho' We are not now that strength which in old days Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are,-- One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

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