Vesper (cocktail)

  • As Noted In: New Era Drinks, International Bartenders Association

Very Strong and Very Cold

The Vesper was invented by Ivar Bryce, a friend of Ian Fleming. Mr Fleming gave the cocktail to the world through his 1953 James Bond novel Casino Royale:

"A dry martini," [Bond] said. "One. In a deep champagne goblet."

"Oui, monsieur."

"Just a moment. Three measures of Gordon's, one of vodka, half a measure of Kina Lillet. Shake it very well until it's ice-cold, then add a large thin slice of lemon peel. Got it?"

"Certainly, monsieur." The barman seemed pleased with the idea.

"Gosh, that's certainly a drink," said Leiter.

Bond laughed. "When I'm...er...concentrating," he explained, "I never have more than one drink before dinner. But I do like that one to be large and very strong and very cold and very well-made. I hate small portions of anything, particularly when they taste bad. This drink's my own invention. I'm going to patent it when I can think of a good name." Ian Fleming, Casino Royale, Chapter 7, "Rouge et Noir'

In the next chapter, Pink Lights and Champagne, James Bond names it Vesper after he meets the beautiful Vesper Lynd.

Directions

Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. - from the experts at International Bartenders Association





Timeline
Y/M/D Person Association Description Place Locale Event
1953/04/13 Ian Fleming Author With the publishing of "Casino Royale", James Bond and Ian Fleming invent the Vesper cocktail.
1953/04/13 Jonathan Cape Ltd Publisher With the publishing of "Casino Royale", James Bond and Ian Fleming invent the Vesper cocktail.
1953/04/13 James Bond British Spy With the publishing of "Casino Royale", James Bond and Ian Fleming invent the Vesper cocktail.

Information »



Particulars for :
Food Attribute Alcohol
Food Attribute Before Dinner Cocktail
Food Attribute Cocktail
Food Category Drink
Product Kind Food




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