Shop Amazon

Independence Square, Philadelphia

  • Historically Known As: State House Yard

  • Travel Genus: Sight , Sight
  • Sight Category: Structure

Frederick Douglass's Address on Slavery

About two hundred persons, about one third of whom were colored, assembled in the Statehouse yard, on Saturday evening, to hear an address delivered by Frederick Douglass, a man of color, formerly a slave. His address was interesting and of an excellent style of composition, delivered in an easy, fluent manner. He preached a sermon supposed to be delivered at the South by a master to his slaves to which the relative duties of the master and slave were given in a bitter strain of sarcasm. The opinions expressed by him were, of course, not approved of by all present, and at times some symptoms of disapprobation were apparent; but the applause of the majority drowned the dissenting voices. He was brought to rather an abrupt conclusion by the preparations for closing the square, at about quarter after 7 o'clock.Philadelphia Public Ledger, August 19, 1844


Advertisement

Timeline

Y/M/D Person Association Description Composition Food Event
Y/M/D Person Association Description Composition Food Event
1784/00/00 Samuel Vaughan Landscape Architect Samuel Vaughan and William Bartram begin collaborating on elaborate landscaping for Independence Hall.
1824/08/18 A large assemblage of citizens in the State House yard appoint Thomas Leiper Chairman, and Mathew Carey Secretary, pass resolutions indicative of the respect and veneration which is every where felt for the veteran soldier, and the Nation's guest.
1824/09/00 William Rush Sculptor Philadelphia erects about a dozen temporary triumphal arches for Lafayette's visit. Made of canvas on wood frames, the Grand Civic Arch near the State House Yard stands 35 high and span 45 feet across Chestnut St.
1824/09/00 William Strickland Artistic Coordinator Philadelphia erects about a dozen temporary triumphal arches for Lafayette's visit. Made of canvas on wood frames, the Grand Civic Arch near the State House Yard stands 35 high and span 45 feet across Chestnut St.
1824/09/28 Thomas Sully Painter Thomas Sully intends to capture the image of Gen Lafayette standing under the Grand Civic Arch dressed in the clothes he typically wears on the tour: a dark suit with a cape. Sully will create a full-length pen-and-wash study in 1825. Lafayette's Triumphal Tour of America
1844/08/17 Frederick Douglass Speaker Invited by abolitionists, Frederick Douglass speaks on anti-slavery to an assembly of 200 persons, about one third of whom are colored. No known text of his speech survives, but the Philadelphia Public Ledger and the Pennsylvania Freeman covered the talk.
1844/08/19 Philadelphia Public Ledger Reporter About two hundred persons, about one third of whom were colored, assembled in the Statehouse yard, on Saturday evening, to hear an address delivered by Frederick Douglass, a man of color, formerly a slave.

Data »

Particulars for Independence Square, Philadelphia:
Area of Significance Architecture
Criteria Historic Event
Sight Category Landscape
Historic Use Plaza
Sight Category Site
Area of Significance Social History
Sight Category Structure




Shop Amazon
Google Ad

Google Ad
?