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Dover


  • Type: Town


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Places

Name of Notable Genus AsNotedIn No Address Proximity Area
Name Genus AsNotedIn Address Proximity Area
Ardmore Hotel
  • Sight
  • ELB 2
18 Castle Hill Rd
Castle Hill House, Including Attached Garden Wall With Gatepiers To South-East
  • Sight
  • ELB 2p
7 Castle Hill Rd
Castle Inn
  • Sight
  • ELB 2
Dolphin Ln
Church Of St Mary Sub-Castro
  • ELB 1
Dover Castle
Church Of St Peter And St Paul
  • Sight
  • ELB 2p
St Alphege Rd Charlton
Cinque Port Arms
  • Sight
  • ELB 2
Clarence Pl
Dover Castle
  • 1001 Hist
  • ELB 1
  • TC
  • KAE
  • Milieu
Dover Castle
Library Dover College
  • ELB 2p
Effingham Cres
Maison Dieu House
  • Sight
  • ELB 2p
Biggin St
Parish Church Of St Andrew Buckland
  • ELB 2p
London Rd
Prince Regent Public House
  • Sight
  • ELB 2
20 Market Sq
Ruins Of Cloisters To West Of The Refectory Of St Martins Priory Dover College
  • ELB 2p
Effingham Cres
School Chapel Dover College
  • ELB 2p
Effingham Cres
St Edmunds Chapel
  • ELB 2p
Priory St
The Alma Public House
  • Sight
  • ELB 2
37 Folkestone Rd
The Parish Church Of St Mary The Virgin
  • Sight
  • ELB 2p
Cannon St
The Roman Pharos
  • ELB 1
Dover Castle
The School Hall Dover College
  • ELB 2p
Effingham Cres
The Town Hall And Maison Dieu HouseThe Town Hall And Remains Of Medieval Maison Dieu
  • ELB 2p
High St

Geography »

Physiographic FeaturesTypeAsNotedIn
Strait of Dover Strait

Data »

Particulars for Dover:
Locale Type English Parish
Locale Type Town



Creative Works »

WorkTypeAsNotedInCreatorNote
A Tale of Two Cities (book) Book Charles Dickens "A Tale of Two Cities" is set in Dover, England, 1775
Dover Beach (poem) Poem Matthew Arnold

Dover Beach (poem)

By

The sea is calm to-night.
The tide is full, the moon lies fair
Upon the straits; on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,
Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!
Only, from the long line of spray
Where the sea meets the moon-blanch'd land,
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high strand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in.

Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Agean, and it brought
Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it by this distant northern sea.

The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth's shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furl'd.
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.

Ah, love, let us be true
To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,
So various, so beautiful, so new,
Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,
Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;
And we are here as on a darkling plain
Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.

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