Turkish Delight

  • Turkish: Lokum
  • As Noted In: 1001 Foods You Must Taste Before You Die, Quintessence Editions

Turkish delight, lokum or rahat lokum, is a rubbery confection of rose oil and sugar. Bound in a stringy gel, today's popular varieties include almonds, mint, chopped dates, pistachios, hazelnuts or walnuts. Traditional lokum are infused with rose, Bergamot orange or lemon. Typically shaped into small cubs, the candy is usually dusted with powder sugar, coconut or powdered cream of tartar to prevent sticking. Chocolate coated cubes with chopped pistachios are also popular. - AsNotedIn




Works

Places
Timeline
Y/M/D Person Association Description Place Locale Event
1775/00/00 In the late 1700s, Bekir Effendi, a world renown candy maker, improves lokum's old recipe of honey, grape molasses, flour and water, when he replaces the grape molasses and flour with German sugar. Ali Muhiddin Haci Bekir Confections Istanbul
1777/00/00 Bekir Effendi moves from his hometown of Kastamonu, a small mountain town in Anatolia, to Istanbul and opens a confectionery shop in the Bahcekapi district. Ali Muhiddin Haci Bekir Confections Istanbul
1861/00/00 Punch (magazine) Media Importation of lokum to England begins. An ad in Punch Magazine boast the "Latest Importation in Sweets. Rahat Lahkoum or Lumps of Delight!".
1870/04/00 Charles Dickens Author Illustrated by Luke Fildes, the first installment of "The Mystery of Edwin Drood" is serialized in Dickens own weekly "All the Year Round" at a purchase price of one shilling. In it, Rosa goes to a Lumps-of-Delight shop.
1870/04/00 Luke Fildes Illustrator Illustrated by Luke Fildes, the first installment of "The Mystery of Edwin Drood" is serialized in Dickens own weekly "All the Year Round" at a purchase price of one shilling. In it, Rosa goes to a Lumps-of-Delight shop.
1870/04/00 All the Year Round Publisher Illustrated by Luke Fildes, the first installment of "The Mystery of Edwin Drood" is serialized in Dickens own weekly "All the Year Round" at a purchase price of one shilling. In it, Rosa goes to a Lumps-of-Delight shop.
1921/00/00 Armenian immigrants, Armen Tertsagian and Mark Balaban, turn excess fruit from their orchard in Cashmere into a new candy based on lokum. Made from Washington apples, honey and walnuts, Aplets were later joined by Cotlets, a candy made from apricots. Cashmere Washington
1962/04/00 Aplets and Cotlets are honored as the official candy of the 1962 Seattle World's Fair. Liberty Orchards makes the confection with less rose flavor. They also added pectin to make it less stringy than original Turkish delight. Century 21 Exposition

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Particulars for :
Product Kind Food
Eatery Category Goodies
Food Attribute Sweets
Food Attribute Turkish Food
Food Category Victual




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