Themes with Washington Irving

Timeline

Y/M/D Description Association Composition Place Locale Food Event
Y/M/D Description Association Composition Place Locale Food Event
1783/04/03 Named after American Revolutionary War hero, George Washington, Washington Irving is born in New York City. Born
1798/00/00 At the age of 15, Washington Irving first sees the Van Tassel cottage on the Hudson River, a few miles below Tarrytown. The dutch cottage is a simple, old stone house with a central chimney, much like the common colonial saltbox. Visitor Sunnyside Greenburgh, NY
1807/00/00 Washington Irving is the first to use Gotham (from the Anglo-Saxon Goat's Town) as another name for New York City in satirical articles he writes for the magazine he co-founded 'Salmagundi'. Author
1819/06/23 "Rip Van Winkle" is published. Author Rip Van Winkle
1819/06/23 The first installment of "The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent" by Washington Irving is published simultaneously in Baltimore, Boston, New York and Philadelphia. Author The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent (Story Collection)
1820/00/00 The Legend of Sleepy Hollow - published Author The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (short story)
1820/00/00 "The Christmas Dinner" by Washington Irving is published. Author The Christmas Dinner (sketch)
1820/00/00 "The Spectre Bridegroom" by Washington Irving is published in 'The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent', 1819-1820, 1848. Author The Spectre Bridegroom (short story)
1820/07/00 Westminster Abbey - published Author Westminster Abbey (literary sketch)
1824/00/00 "The Devil and Tom Walker" by Washington Irving is published. Author The Devil and Tom Walker (Short Story)
1824/00/00 "The Adventure of the German Student" by Washington Irving is collected in 'Tales of a Traveller'. Author The Adventure of the German Student (Short Story)
1824/00/00 "Tales of a Traveller" by Washington Irving is published in Philedelphia by H C Carey and I Lea of Chesnut Street. Author Tales of a Traveller (short story collection)
1828/00/00 Washington Irving visits the Alhambra in Granada, Andalusia, Spain. Visitor Tales of the Alhambra (collection) Alhambra Palace Granada, ES-AN
1832/10/25 Washington Irving takes part in the attempted Ringing of the Wild Horse. He writes of the adventure in "A Tour of the Prairie". Adventurer Ringing the Wild Horse Site Jones
1835/00/00 Washington Irving's "A Tour on the Prairies" is published. Author Ringing the Wild Horse Site Jones
1835/06/07 Irving purchases, Wolfert's Roost, a 17th century Dutch house on the Hudson River for $1,800. Home Sunnyside Greenburgh, NY
1838/00/00 Bolton Priory is built as a home for the Reverend Robert Bolton. Architect Bolton Priory Pelham, NY
1838/00/00 Mary Rogers, the teenage daughter of a widowed boarding-house keeper, clerks at John Anderson's Tobacco Emporium frequented by NP Willis, J Fenimore Cooper, Washington Irving and Edgar Allen Poe and by reporters and editors of NYC's newspapers. Tobacco Customer Mysterious Death of Mary Rogers
1840/00/00 James G King has a semicircular wall built around the Hamilton monument to protect his guest, author Washington Irving, from falling off the promontory where he likes to nap. Visitor Highwood Estate, Weehawken Weehawken
1848/00/00 Irving joins Christ Episcopal Church, serving as a vestryman until his death in 1859. Irving also contributes the ivy, which grows on the church facade, from cuttings he took at Abbotsford House, the home of Sir Walter Scott in Scotland. Faith Christ Episcopal Church Greenburgh, NY
1848/00/00 Captain Jacob Storm and Washington Irving originate the idea for a new cemetery for the villages of Tarrytown and North Tarrytown. Captain Jacob Storm buys the land for the Tarrytown Cemetery in 1948. Developer Sleepy Hollow Cemetery Mount Pleasant, NY
1854/01/09 Astor Library opens, with help from book collector and librarian Joseph Green Cogswell and $400,000 from John Jacob Astor, designed by architect, Alexander Saeltzer. Trustee New York Shakespeare Festival Public Theater New York City
1859/11/28 Washington Irving dies of a heart attack in his bedroom at Sunnyside. Died Sunnyside Greenburgh, NY
1859/12/01 Thousands attend the funeral for Washington Irving at Christ Episcopal Church in Tarrytown, New York. In Memoriam Christ Episcopal Church Greenburgh, NY
1859/12/01 Washington Irving is buried under a simple headstone at Sleepy Hollow cemetery. In Memoriam Sleepy Hollow Cemetery Mount Pleasant, NY

History

Washington Irving was born on April 3, 1783, the eleventh and last child of William and Sarah Irving, a Scottish-English mercantile family in New York. As a youth, Irving led a sheltered life, but still managed to pursue his interests in theater, art, music, travel, and social occasions. Following a trip to Europe between 1804 and 1806, Irving returned to New York, studied for and was admitted to the bar, and began to write humorous short pieces. His first extended project, A History of New York, written under the pseudonym of Diedrich Knickerbocker, was published in 1809. It was an elaborate and intricate satire of old Dutch families of New Netherlands which required much of his time to complete. In this same year, Matilda Hoffman, a young lady whom Irving was deeply attached to, died suddenly. Irving was strongly affected by this and remained a bachelor for life.

In 1815, Irving and his brother Peter sailed for London to attend to the family business which was in great disorder. By 1818, the firm was bankrupt and Irving determined to become a fulltime author. The products of the decision were soon forthcoming and they included: The Sketch Book, 1819-1820; Bracebridge Hall, 1822-1825; The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus, published in three volumes in 1828 after his stay as an attache at the United States Legation in Madrid; and A Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada in 1829 until 1832 he acted as Secretary of the United States Legation in London. In this period he produced two other works including the Alhambra, or the "Spanish Sketch Book," in 1832. During this time, Irving traveled throughout Europe, where he was well-accepted in social and literary circles. With the exception of "Rip Van Winkle," and the "Legend of Sleepy Hollow," in the Sketch Book, his works were concerned with the nostalgia and history of the Old World. Although romantic and sentimental, his books gained critical and financial success, and earned him praise from such authors as Lord Byron, Thomas Campbell and Thomas Moore, and advice from Sir Walter Scott.

In 1832, Irving returned to America after an absence of 17 years, to be greeted by widespread acclaim and appreciation for introducing American literature to the European mainstream. Irving embarked on a trip through the Midwest and then returned to New York. In 1835 he purchased the Van Tassel cottage at Tarrytown and devoted his time toward the reconstruction of that house in his own personal style. In these years following, Irving's writings became less inspired and tended more towards editing older writings and republishing collected works. Once his house was completed, he invited the motherless family of his brother Ebenezer to live with him at Sunnyside and his little "snuggery" was frequently so crowded that he was forced to sleep in his study.

In 1842, Irving was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Spain by President Tyler. Irving had previously been offered the candidacy for the Ma^or of New York City and the Secretaryship of the Navy in Van Buren's cabinet, but Irving chose to avoid these more political posts. Irving returned from Spain in 1846 to Sunnyside, where he began to work on his monumental biography, Life of George Washington. In 1849, he published Oliver Goldsmith; A Biography, and followed this with two volume Mahomet and His Successors. The fifth and final volume of Washington's biography had just been published when Irving died quietly at Sunnyside on November 28, 1859. His funeral, which was attended by thousands, was held at Christ Episcopal Church in Tarrytown, and he was buried in the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, also in Tarrytown. - NRHP

38 Creative Works by Washington Irving »

Title Type Association Y/M/D Moniker
Title Type Association Y/M/D Moniker
Philip of Pokanoket (sketch) Author Written sketch 1814/00/00
Traits of Indian Character (essay) Author Essay 1814/00/00
Rip Van Winkle Author Short Story 1819/06/23
  • 1000 or so Notable Short Stories, True Tales and Mezzobulas
The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent (Story Collection) Author Short Story Collection 1819/06/23
Christmas (essay) Author Essay 1820/00/00
The Wife (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Broken Heart (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Spectre Bridegroom (short story) Author Short Story 1820/00/00
  • 1000 or so Notable Short Stories, True Tales and Mezzobulas
The Angler (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
John Bull (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Christmas Day (essay) Author Essay 1820/00/00
The Country Church (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Roscoe (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
A Sunday in London (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Legend of Sleepy Hollow (short story) Author Short Story 1820/00/00
  • 1000 or so Notable Short Stories, True Tales and Mezzobulas
  • Best American Short Stories
The Stage-Coach (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Art of Book Making (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Christmas Eve (Irving essay) Author Essay 1820/00/00
The Inn Kitchen (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Rural Funerals (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
A Royal Poet (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Voyage (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Author's Account of Himself (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Little Britain (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Mutability of Literature (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Rural Life in England (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Christmas Dinner (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Widow and her Son (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Boar's Head Tavern (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
London Antiques (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
The Pride of the Village (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Statford-on-Avon (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
English Writers on America (sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/00/00
Westminster Abbey (literary sketch) Author Written sketch 1820/07/00
The Adventure of the German Student (Short Story) Author Short Story 1824/00/00
  • 1000 or so Notable Short Stories, True Tales and Mezzobulas
Tales of a Traveller (short story collection) Author Short Story Collection 1824/00/00
The Devil and Tom Walker (Short Story) Author Short Story 1824/00/00
  • 1000 or so Notable Short Stories, True Tales and Mezzobulas
Tales of the Alhambra (collection) Author Collection of Essays 1832/05/00
  • 1000 or so Notable Essays, Treatises and Eruditions

Washington Irving was born on April 3, 1783, the eleventh and last child of William and Sarah Irving, a Scottish-English mercantile family in New York. As a youth, Irving led a sheltered life, but still managed to pursue his interests in theater, art, music, travel, and social occasions. Following a trip to Europe between 1804 and 1806, Irving returned to New York, studied for and was admitted to the bar, and began to write humorous short pieces. His first extended project, A History of New York, written under the pseudonym of Diedrich Knickerbocker, was published in 1809. It was an elaborate and intricate satire of old Dutch families of New Netherlands which required much of his time to complete. In this same year, Matilda Hoffman, a young lady whom Irving was deeply attached to, died suddenly. Irving was strongly affected by this and remained a bachelor for life.

In 1815, Irving and his brother Peter sailed for London to attend to the family business which was in great disorder. By 1818, the firm was bankrupt and Irving determined to become a fulltime author. The products of the decision were soon forthcoming and they included: The Sketch Book, 1819-1820; Bracebridge Hall, 1822-1825; The Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus, published in three volumes in 1828 after his stay as an attache at the United States Legation in Madrid; and A Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada in 1829 until 1832 he acted as Secretary of the United States Legation in London. In this period he produced two other works including the Alhambra, or the "Spanish Sketch Book," in 1832. During this time, Irving traveled throughout Europe, where he was well-accepted in social and literary circles. With the exception of "Rip Van Winkle," and the "Legend of Sleepy Hollow," in the Sketch Book, his works were concerned with the nostalgia and history of the Old World. Although romantic and sentimental, his books gained critical and financial success, and earned him praise from such authors as Lord Byron, Thomas Campbell and Thomas Moore, and advice from Sir Walter Scott.

In 1832, Irving returned to America after an absence of 17 years, to be greeted by widespread acclaim and appreciation for introducing American literature to the European mainstream. Irving embarked on a trip through the Midwest and then returned to New York. In 1835 he purchased the Van Tassel cottage at Tarrytown and devoted his time toward the reconstruction of that house in his own personal style. In these years following, Irving's writings became less inspired and tended more towards editing older writings and republishing collected works. Once his house was completed, he invited the motherless family of his brother Ebenezer to live with him at Sunnyside and his little "snuggery" was frequently so crowded that he was forced to sleep in his study.

In 1842, Irving was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Spain by President Tyler. Irving had previously been offered the candidacy for the Ma^or of New York City and the Secretaryship of the Navy in Van Buren's cabinet, but Irving chose to avoid these more political posts. Irving returned from Spain in 1846 to Sunnyside, where he began to work on his monumental biography, Life of George Washington. In 1849, he published Oliver Goldsmith; A Biography, and followed this with two volume Mahomet and His Successors. The fifth and final volume of Washington's biography had just been published when Irving died quietly at Sunnyside on November 28, 1859. His funeral, which was attended by thousands, was held at Christ Episcopal Church in Tarrytown, and he was buried in the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, also in Tarrytown. - NRHP

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